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Preliminary Program
Meetings

INTERNET CAFE
Sponsored by ProQuest

SATURDAY 7am-6pm
SUNDAY 8am-5:30pm
MONDAY 7:30am-5pm

 

Preliminary Program

May 1
Thursday
1:00pm - 5:00pm
Tours

Denver Mountain Parks (1:00pm – 5:00pm)

Fee: $50

Denver's mountain parks system comprises over 14,000 acres. Heading west from Denver into the foothills, the first stop is at Red Rocks Park & Amphitheatre, a popular venue for both performers and audiences due to its nearly perfect acoustics and beautiful mountain setting.  Then, you will travel up Bear Creek Canyon along the route of pioneer stage coaches to the town of Evergreen, Colorado.  The final stop is at Buffalo Bill Cody’s gravesite and museum overlooking the entire Denver area.  The tour then follows the old “Lariat Trail” to Golden, home of the Colorado School of Mines and Coors beer.


Denver Parks and Neighborhoods (1:00pm - 5:00pm)

Fee: $50

Join guide Carolyn Etter, a former manager of the Denver Parks and Recreation Department, for a tour that takes you through many Denver neighborhoods to visit some of its significant parks. The tour starts on the east side of town in City Park, with its view west over downtown Denver to the Rocky Mountains. The next stop is Cheesman Park, which borders the Capital Hill neighborhood.

Then you'll have time to walk around and explore Denver's 23-acre Botanic Gardens (admission included in tour price)

Next, to Washington Park, on the south side of town-- with its lake and boating Pavillion, this is one of the most popular local spots for runners. Two parks on the west side of town, Berkeley and Sloan's Lake, will cap the tour with views of the mountains to the west and downtown denver to the east.


AIA Downtown Architecture Walking Tour (3:00pm - 5:00pm) FULL

Fee: $20

Learn about Denver's notable architecture and colorful downtown history through such buildings as the Richardsonian Romanesque Brown Palace Hotel, the Equitable Building, with its Tiffany glass windows, gleaming marble floors and walls, mosaic and omate brass and bronze staircases, and Larimer Square, which has the second largest concentration of western Victorian buildings west of the Mississippi.


Public Art Walking Tour (3:00pm - 5:00pm)

Fee: $20

In downtown Denver, painting and sculpture by 19th-century artists Allen Tupper True and Alexander Phimster Proctor comingles with work by contemporary artists Bernar Venet, Sol LeWitt, Fernando Botero and Jonathon Borofsky. See the "big blue bear" by Lawrence Argent, one of the conference plenary speakers.

6:00pm - 8:00pm
Society Circle: An Evening at the Red House

By invitation only

 
May 2
Friday
8:00am - 4:00pm
ARLIS/NA Executive Board Meeting
8:30am - 4:30pm
Tours

Colorado Springs, Colorado (8:30am - 4:30pm) FULL

Fee: $80

With its stunning views of Pikes Peak and Cheyenne Mountain, Colorado Springs is situated about 70 miles south of Denver and boasts its own unique cultural attractions. You’ll pass through many unspoiled vistas (as well as some significant development) on the trip south, with the first stop at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, which borders the campus of Colorado College. The original FAC was designed by architect John Gaw Meem, and was recently renovated and expanded. 

See the article in the December 16th Denver Post:
[ http://www.denverpost.com/search/ci_7717708 ] for more. 

After time to view the FAC collections, and lunch at the FAC’s Terrace Restaurant, you’ll visit the Van Briggle Memorial Pottery, the original location of the oldest, continuously operating art pottery in the United States.  The building is well preserved and richly decorated inside and out with tiles.  The tour will then head west to the historic and luxurious Broadmoor Hotel, where a guide from the Historic Preservation Alliance will show the beautiful turn of the century architecture, paintings by Maxfield Parrish, and the decorative fountains and other elements currently undergoing restoration.


Denver Parks and Neighborhoods (8:30am – 12:30pm)

Fee: $50

Join guide Carolyn Etter, a former manager of the Denver Parks and Recreation Department, for a tour that takes you through many Denver neighborhoods to visit some of its significant parks. The tour starts on the east side of town in City Park, with its view west over downtown Denver to the Rocky Mountains. The next stop is Cheesman Park, which borders the Capital Hill neighborhood.

Then you'll have time to walk around and explore Denver's 23-acre Botanic Gardens (admission included in tour price)

Next, to Washington Park, on the south side of town-- with its lake and boating Pavillion, this is one of the most popular local spots for runners. Two parks on the west side of town, Berkeley and Sloan's Lake, will cap the tour with views of the mountains to the west and downtown denver to the east.


Denver Mountain Parks (12:30pm - 4:30pm)

Fee: $50

Denver's mountain parks system comprises over 14,000 acres. Heading west from Denver into the foothills, the first stop is at Red Rocks Park & Amphitheatre, a popular venue for both performers and audiences due to its nearly perfect acoustics and beautiful mountain setting.  Then, you will travel up Bear Creek Canyon along the route of pioneer stage coaches to the town of Evergreen, Colorado.  The final stop is at Buffalo Bill Cody’s gravesite and museum overlooking the entire Denver area.  The tour then follows the old “Lariat Trail” to Golden, home of the Colorado School of Mines and Coors beer.


Denver Cemetery Tour (12:30pm – 4:30pm)

Fee: $50

Learn more about Denver through its departed denizens.  Professor Annette Stott from the University of Denver, a local cemetery scholar, will lead this tour of Riverside and Fairmount cemeteries.  Find out how local cemeteries reveal Denver’s transition from the Wild West to civilization, about the excavation of stone for markers, the stone carvers, and those who are buried and commemorated.

8:00am - 4:00pm
Workshops

Cataloging Cultural Objects and Practical Applications in the Library (8:00am– 4:00pm)

Cost: $100
Maximum Number: 40

This workshop is aimed towards those who work in image collections and libraries with collections of objects or visual material. The workshop will provide participants with an understanding of how the VRA Core 4.0 and Cataloging Cultural Objects (CCO) fit into the larger metadata landscape. We will also demonstrate database applications that incorporate the Core and CCO, showing how complex works can be cataloged, exporting to XML to various end user interfaces. There will also be a practicum focusing on practical cataloging with CCO. The day workshop will feature multiple interactive components, with instructors available for personal, hands-on assistance.

The workshop will cover three broad topics: how CCO fits into the broader metadata landscape and how it is used in different contexts (libraries, archives, museums, VR collections); the VRA Core and how the Core and CCO are implemented in specific institutions; and a hands-on practicum in learning how to use CCO.

Workshop organizer: Ann Whiteside

Speakers:

Ann Whiteside, Head, Rotch Library of Architecture and Planning, MIT

Margaret Webster, Director, Knight Visual Resources Facility, Cornell University

Elizabeth O'Keefe, Director, Collection Information Services, Morgan Library and Museum

Johanna Baumann, Metadata Associate, ARTstor


ARLIS/NA Mentoring Program Workshop (8:00am – 12:00) FULL

Cost: $0
Maximum Number: 20

Workshop leaders and organizers: V. Heidi Hass & Tony White

In order to facilitate optimal matching of mentor/mentee pairs, a short application form is required; it can be found at: http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/afa/pdc/mentoringform.htm

Attendance at this free Mentoring Program workshop is mandatory for participation in the year-long program.

This Mentoring Workshop is separate from the Conference Mentoring Program; the Conference Mentoring Program is coordinated by Alba Fernandez-Keys and will take place as usual.

This four-hour workshop will be modeled on the successful Banff workshop led by Margaret Law that kicked off the year-long ARLIS/NA Mentoring Program. The workshop, which will be facilitated by Heidi Hass and Tony White, will feature an introduction to mentoring, viewing of a dvd of the Banff workshop, discussion, role-playing, and breakout sessions with mentor/mentee pairs. Characteristics of mentors, mentees, and the mentoring relationship; methods of communication; and benefits and potential pitfalls of mentoring will be discussed. ARLIS members who want to participate in the year-long mentoring program will fill out an application to facilitate matching, and will be required to attend the workshop.

Participants:

Co-facilitator: V. Heidi Hass, Head of the Reference Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum (vhhass@themorgan.org)

Co-facilitator: Tony White, Head, Fine Arts Library, Indiana University (antmwhit@indiana.edu)


Medium Matters: Photography in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction (8:00am – 12:00pm) FULL

Cost: $50
Maximum Number: 20

Participants are introduced to photographic and photomechanical processes likely to be encountered in art libraries and archives. The emergence and use of these technical processes in publishing and art reproduction is covered, with an emphasis on works from the first 150 years of photography’s history (1839-1989). Useful resources are introduced. Study samples are provided for hands-on examination and identification, allowing for the comparison of techniques, materials and condition. The purpose of the workshop is to enable participants to identify the processes employed in reproduction, and to make informed decisions in acquisition, cataloging description, and special handling.

Workshop leaders: Laura Harris, Librarian, Joyce F. Menschel Photography Library, Metropolitan Museum of Art and Lucy von Brachel, Collections Manager, Department of Photographs, Metropolitan Museum of Art


Everyday Leadership:  How to Increase Your Influence at the Institutional Level  (12:30pm - 4:30pm) FULL

Cost: $50
Maximum Number: 15

Workshop leader: Pat Wagner

Which leadership principles can art and design librarians apply in order to increase influence, enhance resources, and cultivate political support?  Learn how to optimize the performance of your area, as well as your own professional contribution.  We will address critical leadership skills, including collaboration, alliances, and managing expectations.

These and other questions will be addressed:

  • Why are leadership skills necessary for all art and design library professionals and associates, no matter what their job titles?
  • How does leadership differ from library administration and management skills?
  • How do we assess the big-picture issues of influence and risk?
  • How do we foster vision and character?
  • What are some practical ways to improve my leadership score?

Pat Wagner has worked with Pattern Research, Inc. and its predecessor, the Office for Open Network, since 1977.  She is an educator, trainer, writer and consultant, focusing on personnel, management, leadership, marketing, career and strategic planning issues.  She has special interests in conflict management, project management, community outreach, and future studies.  Most of her current clients work with and for libraries of all kinds, as well as for library boards, foundations, friends groups, and national, state, and regional library organizations.  Pat also works for innovators in universities, schools, nonprofit institutions, local government and professional, business and trade organizations, as well as medical, scientific, and research institutions.

Workshop organizer: Paul Glassman, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York


They Never Covered This in Library School: Maps and Atlases
Denver Public Library  (12:30pm – 4:30pm)

Cost: $50
Maximum Number: 25

Come to the Rocky Mountains and discover the fascinating world of maps and atlases, a complicated, subtle intersection of time and space, art and language, even bias and intention.  Maps make the abstract concrete and the invisible visible; they give form to the world, but one always skewed by perspective. 

Designed for both beginners and those with experience, this four-hour workshop will guide participants through issues unique to maps, such as developing map and atlas collections (both historical and modern); reference and instruction for art, architecture, and planning courses; the use of maps in public service settings; and collaborating with map librarians. Presenters will demonstrate online mapping sites & applications useful for research and instruction (including Google Earth, mashups, and sample sites using WebGIS).

Workshop leader:  Amy Ciccone, Associate Coordinator Collection Development, University of Southern California, Los Angeles  

Speakers:

Kathryn Lage, Map Librarian, University of Colorado, Boulder

Christopher J. J. Thiry, Map Librarian, Colorado School of Mines

Jennifer Parker, Art & Architecture Librarian, University of Colorado, Boulder

 

4:00pm - 5:00pm
First Time Attendees Orientation
5:30pm - 7:00pm
Convocation and Awards Ceremony

Patricia Limerick, Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado, where she is also a Professor of History.  Limerick is known as an energetic, funny, and engaging public speaker, sought after by a wide range of Western constituencies.

7:00pm - 9:00pm
Welcome Party, Sunset over the Rockies

Capital Peak Ballroom

Sponsored by Artprice.com, University of Colorado at Boulder Libraries, Regis University Libraries, University of Denver Libraries, University of Northern Colorado Libraries, University of Wyoming Libraries, University of Colorado at Denver, Auraria Libraries, ARLIS/Texas-Mexico Chapter, ARLIS/Midstates Chapter, ARLIS/Mountain West Chapter, ARLIS/Southeast Chapter, ARLIS/DC-MD-VA Chapter, ARLIS/Southern California Chapter, ARLIS/Delaware Valley Chapter, ARLIS/Ohio Valley Chapter, ARLIS/New York Chapter, ARLIS/Northern California Chapter, ARLIS/Ontario Chapter, ARLIS/Twin Cities Chapter, and ARLIS/Central Plains Chapter.

 
May 3
Saturday
7:00am - 7:45am
Mile High Yoga

Wake up your body and mind with a series of gentle stretches based on Yoga and related systems of exercise (Qigong).  Practice includes both deep breathing and positions of physical ease.  These 45-minute morning sessions are planned for those with or without prior Yoga or Qigong experience.

Led by B. J. Kish Irvine

7:00am - 8:30am
Leadership Breakfast: The Denver Scramble (Mt. Sopris)

Sponsored by F.A. Bernett Books
By invitation only

How are the roles of library leaders changing in professional associations? Pat Wagner of Pattern Research, Inc., will touch on what other library groups are doing and how ARLIS/NA can help empower members to be more effective leaders.
8:30am - 9:30am
Plenary Speaker

Lawrence Argent, Professor of Art at the University of Denver.  He has exhibited nationally and internationally and is currently working on many public art projects around the country.  Locally, Argent has designed several public sculptures, including I See What You Mean, the large bear peering into the Denver Convention Center.

9:30am - 12:30pm
“In the Exhibits”

Exhibits Open


Web 2.0 Tech Kiosk

Step right up and try your hand at using a Web 2.0 technology!  The tech kiosk will be staffed by friendly colleagues who are happy to show you around the world of blogging, flickr, RSS feeds, wikis, and more.  Whether you've been too shy to venture into Web 2.0 or haven't yet found the time to see what all the buzz is about, take a few minutes to stop by!  Discover free tricks and tools and walk away with some hands-on experience and knowledge of how the world of art information is changing!

Coordinator:
Rebecca  Cooper
, Society of the Cincinnati Library

Kiosk Staffers:

Erika Hauser, Thomas J. Watson Library & Robert Goldwater Library, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Megan Macken, Visual Resources Collection, University of Chicago Department of Art History

Kristen Mastel, MINITEX Library Information Network

Susan Winkler, University of Iowa Art Library


Silent Auction Kick off

 

9:30am-11:00am
Coffee with the Exhibitors

Poster Sessions

Conserving the Past:  Electronic Resources for the Study of Conservation of Ancient Arts and Culture
Barbara Furbush, Getty Research Institute & Cameron Trowbridge, Getty Conservation Institute

We Have E-Journals Too!  Making Art & Design Journals Visible to Walk-In Library Visitors
Heather Ball Gendron, Virginia Tech

The Wom-Art Wikipedia Project
Sarah Falls, ARTstor

11:00am - 12:30pm
Sessions - Conference Center

Visual Pedagogy: Do you See What I See?

Evolving pedagogies provide exciting opportunities for art information professionals to involve themselves in processes of teaching and learning through cutting-edge technologies and teaching methods.  Implications of visual information do not go unnoticed in the current climate; administrators as well as front-line instructors need to focus on the visual component as it affects the individual's ability to learn.  The most recent trends in the historical development of visual literacy will be addressed.  A sampling of instructional approaches, including portals, gaming, and approaches appropriate for museum settings, will be explored.  The panel will also propose future opportunities for art librarians and visual resource curators to play in promoting visual literacy to users who are not art historians.

The session will be augmented with several virtual poster sessions. Session wiki is posted at http://doyouseewhatisee.pbwiki.com/ . All are invited to contribute.

Moderators:

Sarah Carter, Instruction and Research Services Librarian, Verman Kimbrough Memorial Library, Ringling College of Art and Design

Marilyn Berger, Head Librarian. Blackader Lauterman Library of Architecture and Art. McGill University

Speakers:

Katharine Martinez, Herman and Joan Suit Librarian, Harvard University Fine Arts Library: Visual Literacy: The State of the Field Outside Art History

Karen McKenzie, Chief Librarian, Art Gallery of Ontario E.P. Taylor Research Library & Archives: Museum Libraries and Visual Pedagogy: Could, Would or Should There Be an Audience?

Jessica Bozeman, Graduate Intern, DePauw University Visual Resource Center and Brooke Cox, Visual Resources Librarian, DePauw University Visual Resource Center: Games for Information Literacy Instruction in the Visual Arts

Mikael D. Kriz, Reference Librarian and Web Services Unit Coordinator, Saint Louis University Pius XII Memorial Library: Developing a Web-based Art Information Portal


New Voices in the Profession

New Voices will showcase exceptional academic work by students and new professionals (under 5 years post MLS.)

Moderators: Sarah Falls and Meghan Macken

Speakers:

2007 Gerd Muesham Award winner

Tracy Bergstrom, Notre Dame University
A Content Analysis of Visual Resources Collection Websites

Patrick Tomlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Art Library 2.0: What Does it Mean to Be a New Art Librarian in the Digital Age?

Team: Jenica Baty, Tiffany Chao, Jill Zawacki, University of Michigan
Assessment of an Archive: Photographs from Taipei


To ‘Bay or Not to ‘Bay (EBay that is!): Maximizing Online Collection Development for the Savvy Shopper

Until recently, retrospective collection development in art research libraries was limited to specific title searching among a select group of out-of-print book dealers. In this session, acquisitions and collection development librarians from major art research facilities will provide detailed and practical information on various methods to enrich collections by strategically utilizing electronic sources to acquire out-of-print material. Topics to be covered will include best practices for purchasing current and out-of-print material via the Internet, various methods to acquire auction catalogues via the Internet, and subject-specific retrospective collection development.

Speakers:

Terri Boccia, Acquisitions librarian, Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute
Order Now and Get a Free Ginsu Knife! - Strategies for Stretching Your Acquisitions Budget

Inge Reist, Chief of Research Collections and Programs, and Director of the Center for the History of Collecting in America, Frick Art Reference Library
Fair-Warning: The Art of Comparative Shopping for Auction Catalogues

Laura Harris, Associate Museum Librarian, Joyce F. Menschel Photography Library, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Snapshot on the Market: Acquiring Photography Books Today

12:30pm - 2:00pm
Lunch

Exhibits Closed

1:00pm - 2:00pm
Collection Development Discussion Group Brown Bag

Box lunches are available for purchase at "1876" -- the hotel restaurant.

2:00pm - 7:00pm
Exhibits Open
2:00pm - 3:30pm
ArtTECHtonic in Exhibits area

ArtTECHtonic is a virtual session that showcases technology projects in the arts of interest to Art Librarians, through podcasting and blog technology. Podcasts consist of interviews with speakers who describe an idea or project, with methodologies and outcomes. Those who visit the site are welcome to leave questions in the form of comments that will be moderated in weeks following the conference by the speakers.

Sarah Falls will be available in the Exhibits Hall at the ArtTECHtonic table from 2-3:30pm on Saturday, May 3 to assist ARLIS-NA members access site content and answer any questions.

Organized by Sarah Falls, User Services Specialist, ARTstor

2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sessions - Conference Center

Art in the Public … Library

This session will introduce ARLIS/NA members with the art resources available at public libraries. Topics will include art exhibitions, partnerships with academic libraries, and Friends of the Library groups that support many public libraries. Each of these topics will enlighten all art librarians about potential partnerships and encourage everyone to visit their local public library.

Moderator: Alyssa Resnick, Brand Library

Speakers:

Cathy Billings, Brand Library
First Exposures: Contemporary Art Exhibitions in Public Libraries

Pam Eyerdam, Cleveland Public Library
Building Partnerships in Art Libraries: Public and Academic Libraries

Mary Stark, Beverly Hills Public Library
Friend in Need…Friend Indeed!  Partnerships with Friends of the Library


Scholarly Publication and the Art/Architecture/VR Library

This session will address the direct impact scholarly collaborative activities may have on art/architecture librarians and visual resources professionals and will provide tools for those who would like to promote alternatives within their own communities and among broader constituencies. We will also discuss a scholarly publishing project that will test new collaborations, building of collections, and relationships in the academic world.

Technology enables broad, swift, and convenient communication of research, offering authors the promise of increased visibility, as well as flexible reuse, storage, and access to their work. Many publishers have created barriers to this promise. By regaining control of their own work and collaborating with other stakeholders, scholars can share their work on their own terms without compromising the shared values of the academic community. “Scholarly Communication” and “Scholarly Publishing” are the buzzwords for everything from online publishing of print materials to how scholars think about producing content other than print in the online world.  The technologies underpinning scholarly publishing also have the potential to facilitate collaboration between scholars.  While librarians and visual resources professionals have eagerly embraced technology as a means of collaboration, there are few forums for faculty devoted specifically to scholarly collaboration.  This session will explore scholarly communication and collaboration in order to assess the direct impact such activities may have on art and architecture librarians and visual resources professionals. The Society of Architectural Historians engagement in this area will be explored through the SAH AVRN project.

Moderator:
Ann Whiteside, Head, Rotch Library of Architecture and Planning

Speakers:

Ann Whiteside, Head, Rotch Library of Architecture and Planning
Transforming the Librarian Paradigm in the Context of Scholarly Communication

Chris Sugnet, Assistant Dean for Scholarly Communications, University Libraries, Morgan Library Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO
Open Access: Many Flavors in a Single Cone

Dietrich Nuemann, Professor for the History of Modern Architecture and Urban Studies, Department of the History of Art and Architecture, Brown University and Vincent Scully Visiting Professor for the History of Architecture, Yale University
Changing Teaching and Research with Digital Media


Scalable Digital Projects: How to Get Started with a Small Digital Project

Each panelist will frame the discussion by addressing issues common to small digital projects and issues particular to his/her project. Topics to be covered include: selection criteria for digitizing a collection, opportunities for collaboration, staffing & workflow, technical requirements, cataloging, preservation & archival issues, access/delivery system, post-project review & evaluation, publicity & increased demand, and maintaining the collection.

The session will be augmented with several virtual poster sessions (titles/topics tba).

Moderators: Ellen Petraits & Claudia Covert, RISD Library

Speakers:

Joan E. Beaudoin, Ph.D. Student & IMLS Research Fellow , College of Information Science & Technology, Drexel University
Selection Criteria for Digital Projects

Ellen Petraits, Reference Librarian, Fleet Library at RISD
Dazzle Painting-Digitizing a Large Format Collection

Mary Catharine Johnsen, Special Collections Librarian & Design Liaison Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University Libraries
Collaborating to Create a Digital Swiss Poster Collection

3:45pm - 4:45pm
Business meetings – Conference Center

Art & Design School Division - Laura Haxer and Claudia Covert, Moderators

Museum Division - Amy Ballmer, Moderator

Academic Division - Rijn Templeton, Moderator

Visual Resources Division - Sarah Goldstein & Spruill Harder, Moderators

Public Librarians Round Table - Alyssa Resnick, Moderator

5:00pm - 6:00pm
Business meetings – Conference Center

Reference and Information Services Section Project Update - Ross Day and Jacqueline Rogers, Moderators

Architecture Section - Alan Michelson, Moderator

Cataloging Section - Isabella Marques de Castilla, Moderator

Artist Files Working Group - Jon Evans
6:00pm - 7:00pm
Silent Auction Happy Hour
7:00pm

Dine Out in Denver

Sign up to dine with other conference attendees.

 
May 4
Sunday
7:00am - 7:45am
Mile High Yoga

Wake up your body and mind with a series of gentle stretches based on Yoga and related systems of exercise (Qigong).  Practice includes both deep breathing and positions of physical ease.  These 45-minute morning sessions are planned for those with or without prior Yoga or Qigong experience.

Led by B. J. Kish Irvine

8:30am - 9:30am
Diversity Forum: Raising Awareness of Diversity Issues

Our guest speaker will be Trevor Dawes, Circulation Services Director at Princeton University Library.  Mr. Dawes is the past chair of ALA's Committee on Diversity, and the Past-President and founding member of BCALA-NJ.  Mr. Dawes will discuss the importance of diversity and what we can do to encourage it in our libraries and our professional organizations.  He will address some of ALA's recent initiatives and programs, as well as his own efforts to raise awareness on both a local and national level.

9:30am - 12:30pm
“In the Exhibits”

Exhibits Open


Web 2.0 Tech Kiosk

Step right up and try your hand at using a Web 2.0 technology!  The tech kiosk will be staffed by friendly colleagues who are happy to show you around the world of blogging, flickr, RSS feeds, wikis, and more.  Whether you've been too shy to venture into Web 2.0 or haven't yet found the time to see what all the buzz is about, take a few minutes to stop by!  Discover free tricks and tools and walk away with some hands-on experience and knowledge of how the world of art information is changing!

Coordinator:
Rebecca  Cooper
, Society of the Cincinnati Library

Kiosk Staffers:

Erika Hauser, Thomas J. Watson Library & Robert Goldwater Library, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Megan Macken, Visual Resources Collection, University of Chicago Department of Art History

Kristen Mastel, MINITEX Library Information Network

Susan Winkler, University of Iowa Art Library

 

9:30am - 11:00am
Coffee with the Exhibitors

Poster Sessions

The Association of Architecture School Librarians Instruction Workshop -- Lessons Learned
Janine Henri, UCLA & Jeanne Brown, UNLV

A Place for Us:  Art Students in the Centralized Academic Library
Yuki Hibben & Kristina Keogh, Virginia Commonwealth University

Plagiarism:  Enforcing Academic Integrity
Beth Walker, College for Creative Studies

The Creative Evolution of the 1964 Illustrated Book "65 Maximiliana"
David Sume, MA Student, Universite du Quebec a Montreal

11:00am - 12:30pm
Sessions - Conference Center

What’s Hot & What’s Not: Trends in Technologies and Services in Libraries

With the world of information and information-sharing in constant flux, how do librarians keep abreast of trends in library resources, technologies, and services? And, are the trends in academic libraries, equally meaningful for museum and public libraries? Session panel members--all ARLIS NA trendsetters--will highlight what’s “in” and what’s “out,” with an eye on resource-sharing, software, and Web 2.0 tools.  They will describe initiatives with which they are involved and discuss how they relate to art libraries, more generally.

The session will be augmented with several virtual poster sessions (titles/topics tba).

Moderator: Joan Stahl, Branch Manager, Art + Architecture Libraries, University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Speakers:

Amanda Gluibizzi, Assistant Professor, Subject Specialist for History of Art, Fine Arts, and Art Education, The Fine Arts Library, The Ohio State University and Joe Shaw, The Ohio State University.
Art-on-Campus:  Mash-up at OSU

Adina Lerner, Reference Services Librarian, Santa Monica Public Library.
New Frontier: Web Based Software and Free Digital Storage

Megan Macken, Assistant Director, Visual Resources Collection, Department of Art History University of Chicago
Next Generation OPACs: Current Practices & Future Opportunities for Art Libraries


Digital Asset Management in Transition

This session seeks to explore how various types of digital assets originating in cultural institutions are archived, cataloged and accessed. Museums, archives and libraries increasingly create digital content with respect to collections, exhibitions, and other events, which the institution owns or has generated for educational purposes. These digital assets can take many forms, such as collection records, image surrogates, finding aids of exhibition histories, web-based artworks, podcasts of gallery talks, and individual exhibition web sites. They can be managed by various departments within an institution, utilizing many different technologies. A variety of digital assets will be discussed, as well as the underlying hardware and software employed to catalog and/or make them accessible to staff and the public.

Moderators:

Lynda Bunting, Skye Lacerte, Processing Archivist, and Julie Yamashita, Processing Archivist. The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

Speakers:

Layna White, Head of Collections Information and Access, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
The Year(s) of the Digital Asset

Bret Nicely, Web Generalist, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
From Post to Archive: Dynamic Content and Preservation

Sue Maberry, Director of the Library and Instructional Technology, Otis College of Art and Design
Archive 2.0


Managing the Collective Collection

These are paradoxical times for libraries. As demand for rapid access to digital copies increases, publishers continue to release a steady stream of costly print collections in the humanities. As the costs of digital storage go down, the brick and mortar costs to house burgeoning print collections rise. As libraries strive to enhance their presence, users demand access to collections in the large-scale information hubs (Google, Flickr, etc.) where they already work and play. Increasingly, information is disassociated from a particular library or institution. The traditional model that once equated size of a library's physical collection with scholastic excellence is eroding.

New models that address today's shifting landscape of information production, user demands and economic viability are required. This session will survey collaborative initiatives from the broader library community which rethink how we acquire and manage collections, and explore the profound impact of mass digitization on both activities. Collaborations in the art library community in collections development, shared storage and joint digitization will require detailed knowledge of the overlap and uniqueness of collections. A case study of a collections analysis comparing four New York City art libraries rounds out the panel by providing a model for gathering the business intelligence needed to move forward.

Moderator: Deborah Kempe, Chief of Collections Management & Access, Frick Art Reference Library

Speakers:

Lizanne Payne, Executive Director, Washington Research Library Consortium.
Off-Site But Not Out of Reach:
Trends in Shared Storage

Annette Haines, Art & Design Field Librarian, and Rebecca Price, Architecture, Urban Planning and Visual Resources Librarian, Art, Architecture & Engineering Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 
We've Been Googlized: Our Experience with Mass Digitization at the Art, Architecture and Engineering Library, University Of Michigan

Günter Waibel, RLG Programs, OCLC and Milan Hughston, Chief of Library and Museum Archives, Museum of Modern Art.
Rarity is Common: A Case Study Measuring Overlap of the Collections of Four New York Art Libraries

12:30pm - 2:00pm
Lunch

Exhibits Closed

1:00pm - 2:00pm
Teaching Librarians Discussion Group Brown Bag

Cataloging Problems Discussion Group Brown Bag

Box lunches are available for purchase at "1876" -- the hotel restaurant.

2:00pm- 4:00pm
Exhibits Open
2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sessions - Conference Center

Hidden Treasures Redux: Government Art Resources In The 21st Century

Government information is not always utilized when assisting patrons, students or researchers within the art library.   This session will highlight and focus on online official government websites and publications of Canada, Mexico and the United States, as well as various international organizations, relating to the arts.  Discover the myriad of available online arts information resources from notable and unusual government agencies.   A session on this information is long overdue, having last been presented at ARLIS/NA conference in New York in 1989.  There have been lots of changes in government resources during the past 20 years and there are many exciting offerings to aid art librarians of all types.

Moderator: Stephen Allan Patrick,  Professor & Head, Documents, Law & Maps Department, Sherrod Library, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City TN

Speakers:

Jonathan Franklin, National Gallery of Canada Library, Ottawa, Ontario (Past President, ARLIS/NA Canada)
.gc.ca: Canadian Government Resources for the Arts

Gloria Selene Hinojosa, Collection Development Librarian, Alkek Library, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas (Past President, ARLIS/Texas-Mexico)
Arte de Mexico, Image Websites of Mexican Art, from the Ancient to the Contemporary

Stephen Allan Patrick
, Professor and Head, Documents/Law/Maps, Sherrod Library, East Tennessee State University
Uncovered and Discovered: U.S. Government Resources for the 21st Century in the Arts


Beyond the Traditional Archive: Preservation and Access through the Digital Repository

A growing number of universities and other organizations are developing digital institutional repositories. These digital archives provide access to an institution’s intellectual and creative community and may include written materials, databases, images, computer programs, videos, and complex mixtures of media. This panel will explore aspects of a variety of types of digital repositories from their beginnings to future directions. Discussion will focus on the implications of digital repositories for art, architecture, museum and design libraries.

Jessica Branco Colati will offer an overview of Colorado’s Alliance Digital Repository, a consortial project serving several libraries, both academic and public. Annette Haines will report on Deep Blue, the University of Michigan’s institutional repository, including the library’s role and the benefits to artists. She will include examples of art and design work in Deep Blue and discuss the challenges and future directions of this repository for the arts community at the University of Michigan. Leslie Trumble will discuss how a small application built for the digital image collection at the University of Denver’s School of Art and Art History grew into ALORA, a learning object repository used by many different departments to manage digital media and metadata.  ALORA supports image, audio, and video files and allows cross-searching of customizable metadata schemas.

Moderator: Lisa Blankenship, Head of Reference and Art & Theatre Librarian, University of Northern Colorado Libraries

Speakers:

Jessica Branco Colati, Project Director, Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries
Colorado Alliance Digital Repository

Annette Haines, Art & Design Field Librarian, University of Michigan
University of Michigan’s Deep Blue

Leslie Trumble, Director, Visual Media Center, University of Denver
University of Denver’s ALORA


Mile High Planning -- New Directions in Urban Renewal and Sustainability Planning

Denver is currently at the forefront of many city planning trends with emphases on community planning and transit oriented development and the nation’s largest urban infill redevelopment at Stapleton Airport.  In addition the Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute (RMLUI), an organization devoted to land use issues across the western states, is located in Denver.  Taking advantage of having Denver as our host city, this session will bring in speakers from the City Planning Department and the RMLUI to speak about current issues in urban and regional planning, such as urban infill, smart growth, sustainable communities, new urbanism and the relationship of region and city.  We will also have a discussion of current terminology in the field, resources of importance and methodologies and strategies to offer researchers in this area.  We plan to have plenty of time for discussion so that all attendees have a chance to learn together and from our invited guests. 

Moderator:

Susan Koskinen, Head Physics-Astronomy Library, University of California, Berkeley
Introduction

Peter Park, Denver City Planning Department, University of Colorado, Denver.
From Vision to Reality: Implementing Blueprint Denver

Peter Pollock, Ronald Smith Fellow, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Cambridge, Mass.
Planning in the (Not So) Wild West

Rebecca Price, Architecture, Urban Planning and Visual Resources Librarian, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Covering the Bases (and the Outfield): Meeting Urban & Regional  Planning Resource Needs

4:00pm - 5:30pm
Icon or Enclosure?  The Architecture of the Denver Art Museum

The 21st-century art museum is a natural opportunity for architects inclined toward expressive form-giving. With the possible exception of the restoration and additions to New York's Museum of Modern Art by Taniguchi and Associates, few recent designs for major art museums exhibit the least reticence about bold architectural gestures, whether in shape, volume, materials, or color.   Daniel Libeskind’s new Frederic C. Hamilton Building for the Denver Art Museum, with its iconic silhouette, provides us with a paradigm of dynamic form as the context for a major art collection.  Panelists will discuss the design and construction processes for the Hamilton Building, its effect on programs and the museum’s educational mission, as well as the critical narrative that has accompanied a progressive building tradition at the museum.

Moderator: Paul Glassman, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York

Speakers:

Alan Michelson, Head, Architecture and Urban Planning Library, University of Washington, Seattle: Reception at the Designer Gallery:  Four Decades of Architectural Criticism of the Denver Art Museum

Brit Probst, Principal, Davis Partnership Architects, Denver (architects with Daniel Libeskind of the Frederic C. Hamilton Building of the Denver Art Museum): No Right Angles:  Challenges in Building the Frederic C. Hamilton Building

Heather Nielsen, Master Teacher for Native Arts and Head of Community and Family Programs, Denver Art Museum: Thinking outside the Box:  Re-defining the Museum Experience

6:30pm
Transportation to Denver Art Museum begins
6:30pm - 9:30pm

ARLIS/NA at Altitude: A Big DAM Party

Buses start leaving the hotel for the Denver Art Museum at 6:30pm.
Cocktail attire is preferred.
Conference badge is required for entry.

Sponsored by Saskia, Ltd. and the Denver Art Museum.

 
May 5
Monday
8:00am - 10:00am
Membership meeting and continental breakfast

For the first time, the ARLIS/NA Membership Meeting offers a complimentary continental breakfast and a special guest speaker. Loriene Roy, current President of the American Library Association, joins us to share her perspectives on how library associations stay vital over the years and shift with the times.

Speaker: Loriene Roy, President American Library Association

10:15am - 11:45am
Sessions - Conference Center

No Doubt About It, Fashion Is an Art: Fashion Research

This session addresses research in the field of fashion and its many aspects such as: design, global manufacturing and marketing, sales, and research. There will be discussion of the academic (and non-academic) realm (s) into which the study of fashion may fall.

Design It: Fashion forecasts, originally published as an alternative to attending costly and exclusive fashion runway shows, are now a primary resource for the fashion world.  Fashion forecasts are used both in the creation process and the study of fashion.

Make It, Market It:  The business side of fashion is as specialized as the design process. The session will address global trends in marketing and manufacturing and the international westernization of style.

Value It: Art and commerce will be explored in the results of a study of fashion in auction sales.

Research It:  An overview of key fashion research resources in fashion scholarship will be presented, including an analysis of fashion-related theses and dissertations and scholarly journals.

Historicize It:  Grove Art Online does not currently include fashion, but more than 10 years after the initial publication of “The Dictionary of Art” it will!  The challenges and decision-making for defining the scope of fashion history in 200 entries or less will be discussed.  

Moderators: Greta Earnest and Erin Elliott

Speakers:

Maria T. Rothenberg, Technical Services/Reference Librarian, Laboratory Institute of Merchandising – the College for the Business of Fashion.   Design It: Fashion Forecasts as Inspiration

Ana Noriega, Assistant Director of Library Services, Laboratory Institute of Merchandising – the College for the Business of Fashion. Make It, Market It: Fashion’s Global Trends: Then and Now

Greta Earnest, Assistant Director, Gladys Marcus Library, Fashion Institute of Technology. Value It: The Price of Fashion

Erin Elliott, Librarian, Sotheby’s Institute of Art – New York. Research It: Fashionable Research Trends

Jane Woolley, Assistant Editor, Grove Art Online Historicize It: Making Fashion part of Grove Art Online


Effective Public Speaking and Presentations for the Art Information Professional

At one time or another in a career, all art information professionals are called upon to present in front of colleagues, faculty, students, or administrators. These moments range in content and format from a library instruction session, to a session at ARLIS, to a presentation to the provost. The art library professional must effectively present their ideas and essentially “sell the library” to these various constituents. This session will outline the importance of public speaking for art professionals and offer practical tips for improving public speaking. The session will be lead by a communications professor from the University of Denver, who will lay out basic tenets of effective public speaking. There will also be a panel of librarians responding to the talk and putting the speaking tips into context for the art information professional.


Moderator:  Barbara Rockenbach, Director of Undergraduate & Library Research Education, Yale University

Speaker: Jeanette Valenti, PhD, ABD, Adjunct Instructor, University of Denver

Q&A responders: Amy Lucker, Library Director, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU; Barbara Rockenbach, and Jeanette Valenti.


Avery/BHA/Getty Vocabularies

This session will focus on new initiatives in the programs supported by the Getty Research Institute including the Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals, the Bibliography of the History of Art and the Getty Vocabularies and Standards.

Representatives from each program will be highlighting accomplishments of the past year and new directions for the future. Among the topics will be the transition from RLG Eureka to OCLC FirstSearch, globalization efforts and content management.

Speakers:

Terence Ford, Head of Research Databases, Getty Research Institute
New Developments at the Getty Research Institute

Ted Goodman, General Editor, Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals.
Avery Index: Current and Future Projects

Patricia Harpring, Managing Editor, Getty Vocabulary Program, Getty Research Institute
Strategic Developments at the Getty Vocabularies and Standards


Using Numbers and Stories for Advocacy

Large academic libraries now routinely use data to make decisions on priorities and services, and to make a case for improved resources. They often have the infrastructure to collect the data through tools such as surveys, focus groups, interviews, usability testing, benchmarking, or gathering local statistics. How can smaller collections tap into this process? How can various kinds of art libraries and image collections use assessment tools to make a case for more resources or otherwise influence decision-making?  How can they connect within their larger institutions to find data that may already be available, or work collaboratively on projects to create their own supporting data? This session will look at how quantitative and qualitative information can be used to influence decisions.

Moderator: Lynda S. White, Associate Director, Management Information Services, University of Virginia Library

Speakers:

Jeanne Brown, Head, Architecture Studies Library, University of Nevada-Las Vegas.
Telling Stories about the Library: Using Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches to Depicting the Library

Laura Graveline, Visual Arts Librarian, Sherman Art Library, Dartmouth College
Assessment and Web Design

Elizabeth Schaub, Director, Visual Resources Collection, School of Architecture, University of Texas-Austin, on behalf of Laura Schwartz, Head, Fine Arts Library, University of Texas-Austin.
Assessment, Is It Really Worth It?: the UT Austin Fine Arts Library, a Case Study

Rina Vecchiola, Art and Architecture Librarian, Kenneth and Nancy Kranzberg Art and Architecture Library, Washington University in St. Louis
The Customer Centered Library: Using LibQUAL Survey Results in an Academic Branch Library.

12:00 - 1:30pm
ARTstor User Group Meeting [Lunch]

Update on recent developments in collections, technologies and services provided by ARTstor Digital Library. Topics to be covered will include intellectual property concerns, collaborations with contributors, interoperability and integration of image resources, institutional hosting program news, and services to users.

Moderator: Carole Ann Fabian, ARTstor Director of Strategic Outreach and User Services

2:00pm - 3:00pm
Plenary Speaker: Dr. David Silver

This talk will address four different and overlapping contemporary literacies – literacy, e-literacy, me-literacy, and we-literacy – as a way to better understand today's college students. Part panic, part celebration, the presentation begins with an overview of the four literacies with special attention paid to the increasing role of visual culture. Next, mixing the speaker's experiences in the classroom and his own notes and observations regarding talks and workshops from this year's ARLIS/NA conference, the presentation will offer instructional examples to teach, display, and archive such literacies.
 
David Silver is an assistant professor of Media Studies and the director of the Resource Center for Cyberculture Studies at the University of San Francisco. He co-directs The September Project, a grassroots effort to foster public events in all libraries in all countries in September, and co-edited Critical Cyberculture Studies (NYU Press, 2006). He blogs at silver in sf.

Supported by the ARTstor Speaker Fund.

3:30pm - 5:00pm
Sessions – Conference Center

Rules and Tools: Contributing to the Getty Vocabularies, Encore

Do you need new AAT terms for your cataloging? Is an artist that you need missing from the ULAN? Do you want to add a new place name to the TGN? The AAT, ULAN, and TGN grow through contributions from the user community. Contributing your terms makes these resources more useful for everyone. We welcome all current or would-be users to a session where you will learn how to contribute via the online Web form. Instructions will also be available for those wishing to contribute in bulk via our XML format. Discussions include how do you know which is the “preferred” term, where do you find published sources for names, and other topics.

Moderator: Patricia Harpring, PhD. Managing Editor, Getty Vocabulary Program, Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, California


Bye-Bye B.I.: Innovative Approaches to Library Instruction

Fading away are the stand-alone show-and-tell sessions in the library classroom where librarians demonstrated the library catalog and the research process.  Boring for us; boring for them. Today’s users require technology-driven, collaborative, working sessions.   But just who are today’s users?  This session will present the findings and impact of the ethnographic study on the behavior of undergrads at the University of Rochester as a starting point and expand into some of the new approaches in instruction and outreach being used by librarians in university, museum and visual resources collections. 

Moderator:
Betsy Peck Learned, Interim Dean of University Libraries, Roger Williams University

Speakers:

Stephanie Frontz, Art Librarian, Head of the Art/Music Library. University of Rochester. We Asked…We Listened…We Changed…: The Undergraduate Study at the University of Rochester

Jane Carlin, Head, Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning Library. University of Cincinnati. "Exciting Research" - An Oxymoron?  Using Problem-Based Learning to Enhance Library Instruction

Beth Hylen, Reference Librarian, Rakow Research Library, Corning Museum of Glass. Shattering Glass Walls: The Corning Museum Breaks Out

Maureen Burns, Visual Resources Curator. University of California, Irvine. Image Explosion!  Outreach and Instruction Beyond the Arts


Women Artists of the American West

Why care about women artists and especially Women Artists of the American West? Have these artists made any difference to the art world as we know it?  Come and find out why these women artists have made a difference.

This session will focus on women artists of the American West, who currently live or once lived west of the Mississippi River, who have made substantial contributions to the art world.

Curators, scholars, and artists will speak on the work of women artists of the American West who represent various cultural groups and philosophies of art. The cultural groups that will be represented include Native Americans and Anglo Americans.  Concepts of community, identity, spirituality, and locality will be explored along with images of these artists’ work.  Together, these women artists represent a partial spectrum of ethnicities and cultures that comprise the American West.  There will be a printed bibliography of resources available.

Moderators:  Mari Russell, Ph.D., Director of the Academic Support Center at Haskell Indian Nations University, Lawrence, Kansas and Eumie Imm-Stroukoff, Librarian and Assistant Director, Georgia O'Keeffe Museum Research Center.

Speakers:

Annette Stott, Professor of Art History at the University of Denver. Creative Women in the 'Old' West

Barbara Buhler Lynes, Curator of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum and Emily Fisher Landau Director of the Research Center. Georgia O’Keeffe as Icon: Establishing and Shaping the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum and its Collections

C. Maxx Stevens, Seminole/Muscogee Nations of the Oklahoma Region and Assistant Professor of Art at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Artwork by C. Maxx Stevens

6:00pm - 8:30pm
Post-conference ARLIS/NA Executive Board Meeting
6:00pm

Dine Out in Denver

Sign up to dine with other conference attendees.

 
May 6
Tuesday
8:30am - 4:30pm
Tours

Boulder, Colorado (8:30am– 4:30pm)

Fee: $70

Located about 30 miles northwest of Denver, Boulder is known for its natural beauty and as the home of the University of Colorado (CU).  The tour will begin at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), one of  I.M. Pei’s most impressive works, set in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains just outside of Boulder.  The next stop will be on the CU campus, with its striking “Tuscan Vernacular” architecture typified by buildings of indigenous sandstone, red barrel tile roofs and black wrought iron accents, where you’ll visit a special exhibit in the Art and Architecture Library. 

You’ll have time for shopping and lunch on your own on the Pearl Street Mall, a beautiful, four block pedestrian mall with historic buildings and native plantings, before the final stop, the Colorado Chautauqua National Historical Monument, comprised of cottages and lodges at the foot of Boulder’s Flatiron mountains.  Built in 1911, the newly renovated Missions House Lodge features a spectacular great room with a stone fireplace in an Arts and Crafts interior.


AIA Downtown Architecture Walking Tour (9:00am – 11:00am)

Fee: $20

Learn about Denver's notable architecture and colorful downtown history through such buildings as the Richardsonian Romanesque Brown Palace Hotel, the Equitable Building, with its Tiffany glass windows, gleaming marble floors and walls, mosaic and omate brass and bronze staircases, and Larimer Square, which has the second largest concentration of western Victorian buildings west of the Mississippi.


Public Art Walking Tour (9:00am - 11:00am)

Fee: $20

In downtown Denver, painting and sculpture by 19th-century artists Allen Tupper True and Alexander Phimster Proctor comingles with work by contemporary artists Bernar Venet, Sol LeWitt, Fernando Botero and Jonathon Borofsky. See the "big blue bear" by Lawrence Argent, one of the conference plenary speakers.


Denver Performing Arts Complex Tour (10:00am - 11:30am)

Fee: $20

This behind-the-scenes tour provides a unique look at the Arts Complex and showcases rarely seen areas such as Actor’s Alley, where hand-painted replicas of Broadway show posters adorn the walls and feature autographs of cast members.  See theatre design and construction first hand in the Tramway Building where all of the props, costumes, lighting and scenery are created for the Denver Center Theatre Company, and the stunning Ellie Caulkins Opera House, which is a 2,225-seat venue with flowing lines resembling a lyre lined with cherry wood.

 
last update: April 29, 2008

Program Co-Chairs:
Jeanne Brown, jeanne.brown@unlv.edu
Mary Graham, megraham@email.arizona.edu

Conference Manager:
Susan Rawlyk, arlisna@mcphersonclarke.com

 
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